nymphbot:

I’m an artist in zer early twenties currently getting by with the help of my family. Anxiety has kept me from work for the past year, and my savings have fully disappeared. Having practiced drawing for over a decade, I figured that if I have to work, art commissions may be my best bet. For more examples of my work, please check my blog at nymphbot.

Please email me at nymphbeast@gmail.com to discuss the details of your commission. I will send you an invoice via Paypal, so let me know if the email linked to your Paypal is different from the one by which we are corresponding. NOTE: Due to Paypal’s terms of use, any erotic commissions will necessarily have to meet the guidelines listed here: _X_

If desired, I will send progress images via email.

Prices listed cover your digital copy of the artwork. Because I work in traditional mediums, I can also send the original for the cost of shipping.

I reserve the right to reproduce commissioned images for promotional and commercial purposes unless otherwise negotiated.

Got myself a small job yesterday.

Got myself these two today :)

Got myself a small job yesterday.

Got myself these two today :)

solar-citrus:

You would be surprised with how many people in your life could be going through depression at this very moment.  People hide it like a paper bag over their heads out of fear of being judged, made fun of, seen as weak, or just not taken seriously.  Depression should not be taken lightly, it holds us down from our purpose and potential in life.  Those who tell you that it doesn’t exist have never experienced depression in their life, therefore not understanding the symptoms and how it’s something that cannot be fixed in a day!  So if you think you are depressed or if you think you know someone else who is, please talk to a friend, a family member, or anyone else in your life that you trust - never overlook the possibility of seeing a doctor for more professional help!!  Your feelings are real, your feelings are shared upon millions.  Don’t hide it, talk to someone about it.  With the right help, you can rediscover your confidence and begin life anew with our undying love and support!

We are right here!!

(via astropheminism)

websandwhiskers:

placeofpluto:

websandwhiskers:

THIS HAD BEEN DRIVING ME NUTS FOR FOREVER. 

So there.  Now I have figured it out. 

People who I suspect have thought about this less than me:

  • Tolkien
  • Peter Jackson
  • real geneticists
  • God
  • anyone

I’m no expert on genetics, but I want to posit an alternative theory.

Let us assume that the sex of a dwarf is determined not by a pair of chromosomes, but by a triplet, of which the male contributes 2 chromosomes, and the female 1.

Say a female is XXX, and a male is XXY.

This will result in the following combinations (father contributions noted first, mother contributions is always X):

XX: XXX, XXX, XXX,XY: XXY, XXY, XXY,
XY: XXY, XXY, XXY

This will result in the exact 1:3 ratio of females.

This also means that every dwarf can be fertile, I think if they were not it would have been noted somewhere.

I’m getting a different result, with that possibility, but I’m not 100% sure I follow (and it’s really late here).

I’m gonna see if I can restate, and you correct me if I’m not getting it on some point or other.

Female: XXX

Male: XXY

So, mother will always contribute X to offspring.

Father can contribute either XX or XY to offspring. 

So you get a punnett square that looks like this:

If I’m understanding your theory properly, you counted XY twice. 

Yes, because the father is twice as likely to give an XY than an XX. Lets code it as follows. A male is X1 X2 and Y0, thus the combination you can make are: X1 & X2, X1 & Y0 and X2 and Y0. that are three combinations, one is XX, and two are XY.

(EDIT: I cannot seem to load the punnet squares)

EDIT2: punnet square:

Father (X1 X2 Y0)on the vertical axis, mother (X1 X2 X3) on the horizontal axis. 

yonderarebeards:

yonderarebeards:

Belgium is building a beer pipeline

yup

yup, yup

Acutally, Hartog Jan already has one

It goes from the brewery (on the left), over the road:

(The pipe reads: Here flows Hertog Jan Beer)

Right into the bar across the street:

(via messedupinaneatway)

websandwhiskers:

THIS HAD BEEN DRIVING ME NUTS FOR FOREVER. 

So there.  Now I have figured it out. 

People who I suspect have thought about this less than me:

  • Tolkien
  • Peter Jackson
  • real geneticists
  • God
  • anyone

I’m no expert on genetics, but I want to posit an alternative theory.

Let us assume that the sex of a dwarf is determined not by a pair of chromosomes, but by a triplet, of which the male contributes 2 chromosomes, and the female 1.

Say a female is XXX, and a male is XXY.

This will result in the following combinations (father contributions noted first, mother contributions is always X):

XX: XXX, XXX, XXX,XY: XXY, XXY, XXY,
XY: XXY, XXY, XXY

This will result in the exact 1:3 ratio of females.

This also means that every dwarf can be fertile, I think if they were not it would have been noted somewhere.

scinote:

What is it like to live and do science at a South-Pole research station?

Can you imagine living in the frigid and utterly desolate environment of the South Pole for nearly 11 months? Well, we can’t either, but Jason Gallicchio, a postdoctoral researcher at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, has done it.

Gallicchio, an associate fellow for the Kavli Insitute of Physics at the University of Chicago, is part of an astrophysics experiment at the South Pole Telescope. He knows all about the challenges of building and maintaining such a complex scientific instrument in one of the most unforgiving places on the planet. Gallacchio was primarily responsible for the telescope’s data acquisition and software systems, and he also occasionally assisted with some maintenance work.
You might ask why anyone would even put a telescope in such a hostile environment in the first place. It’s not an accident, I promise! Actually, placing the telescope at the South Pole minimizes the interference from the Earth’s atmosphere. One of the primary objectives of the South Pole Telescope is to precisely measure temperature variations in the cosmic microwave background, and getting such precise measurements requires the telescope to be put in a high, dry, and atmospherically stable site. 
The South Pole Telescope is 10 meters across and weighs 280 tons. Researchers use this telescope to study cosmic microwave background radiation (or CMB, as it’s often affectionately called), hoping to uncover hints about the early days of our universe.
As Erik M. Leitch of the University of Chicago explains, CMB is a sort of faint glow of light that fills the universe, falling on Earth from every direction with nearly uniform intensity. It is the residual heat of creation—the afterglow of the Big Bang—streaming through space in these last 14 billion years, like the heat from a sun-warmed rock, re-radiated at night. 
Click here to read more about life at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.
You can learn even more about the topics discussed in this summary at the links below: 
Amundsen-Scott South Pole StationA brief introduction to the Electromagnetic spectrumCosmic microwave backgroundA day in the life of South Pole TelescopeBig Science With The South Pole Telescope

Submitted by Srikar D, Discoverer.
Edited by Jessica F.

scinote:

What is it like to live and do science at a South-Pole research station?

Can you imagine living in the frigid and utterly desolate environment of the South Pole for nearly 11 months? Well, we can’t either, but Jason Gallicchio, a postdoctoral researcher at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, has done it.

Gallicchio, an associate fellow for the Kavli Insitute of Physics at the University of Chicago, is part of an astrophysics experiment at the South Pole Telescope. He knows all about the challenges of building and maintaining such a complex scientific instrument in one of the most unforgiving places on the planet. Gallacchio was primarily responsible for the telescope’s data acquisition and software systems, and he also occasionally assisted with some maintenance work.

You might ask why anyone would even put a telescope in such a hostile environment in the first place. It’s not an accident, I promise! Actually, placing the telescope at the South Pole minimizes the interference from the Earth’s atmosphere. One of the primary objectives of the South Pole Telescope is to precisely measure temperature variations in the cosmic microwave background, and getting such precise measurements requires the telescope to be put in a high, dry, and atmospherically stable site. 

The South Pole Telescope is 10 meters across and weighs 280 tons. Researchers use this telescope to study cosmic microwave background radiation (or CMB, as it’s often affectionately called), hoping to uncover hints about the early days of our universe.

As Erik M. Leitch of the University of Chicago explains, CMB is a sort of faint glow of light that fills the universe, falling on Earth from every direction with nearly uniform intensity. It is the residual heat of creation—the afterglow of the Big Bang—streaming through space in these last 14 billion years, like the heat from a sun-warmed rock, re-radiated at night. 

Click here to read more about life at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.

You can learn even more about the topics discussed in this summary at the links below: 

Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station
A brief introduction to the Electromagnetic spectrum
Cosmic microwave background
A day in the life of South Pole Telescope
Big Science With The South Pole Telescope

Submitted by Srikar D, Discoverer.

Edited by Jessica F.

(via shychemist)

xtelepathx-cerebro:

can-u-not-my-wayward-son:

not to mention drinking hot drinks. steamy glasses will be the death of me

Emptying a steamy dishwasher. Pouring out a hot pan of water. Rain. Sand. Random scratches that just appear in your vision.

wearing ski goggles. Headbanging. Mosh pit. Binoculars.

xtelepathx-cerebro:

can-u-not-my-wayward-son:

not to mention drinking hot drinks. steamy glasses will be the death of me

Emptying a steamy dishwasher. Pouring out a hot pan of water. Rain. Sand. Random scratches that just appear in your vision.

wearing ski goggles. Headbanging. Mosh pit. Binoculars.

(via laikas-owner)

jlwxthomas:

jerology:

http://jerology.tumblr.com/ | Have a Cold One
Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder.

rubencjr
♥

I thought this was a photo >.>

jlwxthomas:

jerology:

http://jerology.tumblr.com/ | Have a Cold One

Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder.

rubencjr

I thought this was a photo >.>

(via kaskitewapisk)

stuffwhitepeopleask:

mooseings:

Channel 9 cameraman calls Australian Muslim a “fucking terrorist” and then his reaction is used by the media to portray “Muslim gets angry at cameraman”.

Look at this prime example of just how messed up Australia’s media is. Look at how desperate they are to fuel the xenophobia that’s sweeping through the country since the introduction of Tony Abbott’s new “Terror Laws” and raising the Terror Alert. It’s absolutely disgusting. 

HIs voice is breaking because he’s fucking fed up with this bullshit and its no wonder.

(via teachjoanne)